Are You Engaging New Agents, or Training Them for Your Competitors?

Our contact centers today have a wide range of new hire training agendas depending on the complexity of the products and services, skills trained and even the size of the centers. There’s classroom time, self-directed learning, tests, games and activities, guest speakers, call examples to listen to, side-by-side observations and even mentors.

Many managers are very focused on coaching experienced agents to insure continuously improved skills and growth for them within the center. Some of these same managers, however, are missing the opportunity to provide newly hired agents the same benefits of coaching received during the crucial first days of training.

Regardless of the size of the center and complexity of training, I find that there is a lot of training process happening and not a lot of agent engagement.

Trainers on a fast-paced schedule get caught up with the need to stuff those eager new agent heads with tons of detailed information. Some have told me that they are following a checklist and their goal is to check off the skills taught as their measure of success. Others feel they are successful if the new hires test well in the classroom.

In the midst of all this organization and process, new agents may be lost.

New agents may lose the great enthusiasm they displayed in their interview and during the “honeymoon” period of the first two weeks in training. The excitement withers and even may die, ending in turnover if they aren’t feeling engaged and motivated.

Managers have complained to me about agents who looked so promising at the beginning of training and then ended up being average or worse in terms of skills and attitude.

The question to be answered is whether they hired the wrong person or was the reason more about lack of engagement, personal interaction, and motivation during training and even after.

Some agents have told me that they were initially excited to be a part of the team but soon found that the excitement wasn’t supported or encouraged by the trainers, supervisors and managers. Others say that they are being lectured to and never asked for their input during their training as new agents. A few complain that they never had a one to one sit down with their new supervisor during the first month to share experiences and get to know them.

New hires must have personalized one to one time, not only with their trainers but also with their supervisors. Despite all these processes in place to document progress and skills, the personal connection with leadership certainly appears to be lost for many. The supervisor never really bonds with the new agent until later, if at all.

Coaching with seasoned agents is tough enough for us to do well consistently given all the center challenges we face as leaders. Coaching with new hires can be even more challenging. They enter eager, positive and open to learning. They need validation from day one.

Our new agents need personal feedback daily, especially during the first few weeks of training, and then weekly as they progress through your on-boarding agenda to becoming a fully engaged member of your team.

Make sure your trainers and front line leaders are making agent engagement a priority so new hires feel welcome and involved right from the start. If not, your call center competitors in town will be thanking you for sending new agents their way!

 

About the author

Since 1983, Melissa has partnered with Contact Centers and Retail Teams to help them develop strategies, operational processes and skills to successfully blend People, Process and Technology for Customer Experience success.

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